The Lou Marsh Legacy - Honouring Canada's Top Athletes

RILED WESTERNERS BUT THEY LIKED IT

Thursday, March 5, 1936

Winnipeg Readers Wanted to See What Lou Marsh Wrote

GLAD HE KNEW LOU

Special to The Star

Winnipeg, March 5—Writing in his column, “In the Realm of Sport,” E. A. Armstrong of the Winnipeg Free Press, commented as follows:

“Canada’s best known sports writer is dead, no other newspaperman in the Dominion ever covered the wide range of sports contests on this continent or abroad than Lou Marsh did.

“His sudden passing removes a personage who had an enormous range of authority from actual association with the many sports he either competed in himself or in which he acted as an official. There was no colour to Lou Marsh, his breezy column in the Toronto Star was the most widely-read in the Dominion. Whenever he appeared in a boxing or wrestling ring as a third man, or on the ice as a referee, he invariably commanded attention at some time or other during the evening.

“His articles on sporting events of Dominion-wide interest often appeared on these pages. Our readers wanted to see ‘what Marsh said.’ Often times he riled western readers, oftentimes he sent them into fits of laughter by his picturesque similes, metaphors, wit and sarcasm. There was nothing reticent about Lou Marsh. He was a hard worker. Hours meant nothing to him all through his 46 years’ association with his paper. He had a zest for work which he maintained to the very last.

“His passing is an immeasurable blow to amateur sport in Canada. Lou championed the cause to the very last. When he elected to “ride” a sport, a promoter, team or an individual for anything he considered unbecoming, he was fearless and graphic. His tribute to the Winnipeg rugby team after the triumph in Hamilton is still vividly recalled as the ‘best to come out of the west.’

“During the past 10 years it was my privilege to come in contact with him several times on eastern invasions. Lou Marsh always made it his business to extend every courtesy possible to visiting newspapermen. I’m glad I knew Lou Marsh.”